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Streetcar named Desire

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❶The film techniques that were used by Kazan in the film adaptation entertained the audience even more. Blanche is known as a pathological liar who lives in the past and gives into desire.

Streetcar Named Desire

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Her own promiscuous sexual desire destroys her reputation and her professional career. The rape by Stanley, which he claims is the culmination of a perverse desire they felt for each other all along, is the act that finally pushes her into insanity. Just as Belle Reve is a relic of the plantation system that was the cornerstone of the civilization of the Old South, so is Blanche an anachronistic leftover from that culture.

She is a southern belle, born to privilege and meant to be beautiful and refined, to read poetry, to flirt, and ultimately to marry and reproduce. Blanche is born too late in the history of her family and in the history of the South to inherit this legacy: The money is gone; the values are disintegrating.

She hangs on to what vestiges of gentility she can, but this serves only to alienate rather than to shield her. Tender and delicate, like the moth she resembles, Blanche is unable to survive in the harsh reality of modern society.

There is more to the character of Blanche than merely the role of pathetic victim. She, too, has been active in her destruction. Despite recognizing her own undeniable flaws, she makes very little attempt to disguise her contempt for those she feels are inferior to her in refinement, and she is willing to use Mitch and Stanley to provide for her.

If Blanche represents defunct southern values, Stanley represents the new, urban modernity, which pays little heed to the past. If Belle Reve is not going to mean a financial inheritance, Stanley is no longer interested in Belle Reve. However, Stanley, like Blanche, is an ambiguous character.

His cruel intolerance of Blanche can be seen as justifiable response to her lies, hypocrisy, and mockery, but his nasty streak of violence against his wife appalls even his friends. His rape of Blanche is a horrifying and destructive act as well as a cruel betrayal of Stella. Ultimately, however, Stanley prevails. Search A Streetcar Named Desire. He has no patience for idle chit-chat, social compliments, fools, and frauds. Blanche repeatedly refers to Stanley and his world as brutish, primitive, apelike, rough, and uncivilized.

Stanley finds this sort of superiority offensive and says so, but there is something primal and brutish about Stanley. By contrast, Blanche represents civilization on the decline. She speaks vaguely of art, music, and poetry as proof of progress, but reveals little true knowledge. Expand on this description. The story of the DuBois and Kowalski families depicts the evolving society of the South over the first half of the twentieth century.

The DuBois clan, embodied in the play by Blanche, represents the genteel society of the Southern plantation owners that presided through the nineteenth century. Stanley Kowalski, the son of Polish immigrants, descends from new Southerners. He works in a factory and is therefore engaged in the industrialization of the South, which contributed to the demise of the agrarian society in which Blanche and Stella were raised.

The play demonstrates that Stanley is well adapted for survival in the New South, represented by the diverse city of New Orleans, while Blanche is unable to survive in the new society.

Blanche deludes herself and imagines she lives in a world in which manners and pretensions are still relevant. Stella, however, has turned her back on her ancestors and married someone who would have been considered below her station by her own people.

Stanley is new blood, for a new South in transition. But Williams portrays Stanley as possessing a fare share of brutality, suggesting that the changing world in which Stanley fits so perfectly is not necessarily a kind one. The struggle for survival has replaced gentility, and Blanche is an inevitable loser in this struggle. Unable to cope or to find a way to support herself since the loss of Belle Reve, Blanche goes mad and departs from reality. Stella sustains herself through her marriage and sexual union with Stanley.

A Streetcar Named Desire by: Themes Motifs Symbols Key Facts.

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In A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams creates a complex web of conflicting emotions, which creates tension between characters. Williams presented many emotional conflicts with his character Stanley and the other characters in the play. In A Streetcar Named Desire, by Tennessee Williams. Streetcar Named Desire Essay: Themes in A Streetcar Named Desire - Themes in A Streetcar Named Desire A Streetcar Named Desire is a pessimistic work that is the “culmination of a view of life in which evil, or at least undiminished insensitivity, conquers throughout no matter what the protagonistic forces do”(Szeliski 69).

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Home Essay Samples Streetcar Named Desire Different approaches can be used to compare a play to its film adaptation. The strategies used vary depending on the similarities or differences portrayed by the film and the play. Symbolism in A Street Car Named Desire - Essay. Print Reference this. Published: 23rd March, Last Edited: 1st June, Keywords: symbols in a streetcar named desire, a streetcar named desire symbols. Tennessee Williams' play A Street Car Name Desire is a domestic drama. There is a film adaptation of play which released in .