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Expository Essay Definition

❶An expository essay may or may not have an overt central argument, though it does set forth points of view on the topic. Writing a Letter Writing an Evaluation Letter 3.

What Is Expository Writing?

What is the key feature of expository essay topics?
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Definition of Expository Writing

Choose an Essay Topic. Your topic may be assigned, but if you have a chance to select your own, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, look for a topic that interests you. Second, your topic should be fairly narrow. Big topics are better suited to books than an essay. If you have a large topic, consider the various ways you can narrow it down to make it fit into an expository essay. Whether you are writing for middle school, high school or college the correct expository essay format is important.

Ideally, you want an essay that is easy to read and presents the information in a clear manner. Most expository essays are just five paragraphs long, with one paragraph each for the intro and conclusion. That leaves you with three paragraphs for the body of the essay. If you have more information, you can add more body paragraphs, but these will always be sandwiched between the introduction and conclusion. Keep in mind that while it's possible to write a longer essay, it's easiest to stick to the basics unless you have other instructions from your professor.

An outline gives your writing project structure and keeps it focused. Writing up an outline ahead of time is a good way to ensure you write a great essay that stays on topic. If you find yourself struggling to create an outline, you may want to start with a template. Working with a template can help you structure your essay and will allow you to create a top quality paper to turn in. Templates give you a prompt for each section, to get you thinking about what you need to cover. Start at the Beginning.

Your expository essay should start out with an introduction that uses a hook to grab the reader's attention. An interesting fact or an issue that needs a solution can be a useful way to begin. From there, introduce your main idea and provide some context. Without context, the reader is left wondering why they need to know what you have to say. The introduction of the essay presents the topic and lets your reader know exactly what to expect from the essay.

If the author seems to value a particular argument or slant that is not supported or only thinly supported by fact, then this source may not be trustworthy. If you are still concerned about a source, cross check some of its information against a trustworthy source. Read your sources well.

Make sure that you understand what the author is saying. Take time to look up words and concepts that you do not understand. Otherwise, you might end up misreading and misusing your sources. Take notes while your read your sources. Highlight and underline significant passages so that you can come back to them. As you read, take note of significant information in your sources by jotting the information down in a notebook.

Write down the publishing information of each source. You will need this information for your "References," "Bibliography," or "Works Cited" pages. Format this page according to your instructor's guidelines.

Develop your tentative thesis. Effective thesis statements express the main focus of a paper and state an arguable claim. A thesis is often one sentence in length but may be longer depending on your topic and the detail of your essay. Do not state facts or matters of taste. For example, "George Washington was the first president of the United States," is not a good thesis because it states a fact.

Likewise, "Die Hard is a great movie," is not a good thesis because it expresses a matter of taste. In other words, avoid just saying that something is "good" or "effective. Begin with an engaging sentence that gets right into your topic. Your introduction should immediately begin discussing your topic. Think about what you will discuss in your essay to help you determine what you should include in your introduction.

Keep in mind that your introduction should identify the main idea of your expository essay and act as a preview to your essay. You could start with an anecdote, an informative and attention-grabbing quote, a bold opinion statement, or anything that will make your readers want to continue with your essay.

Provide enough background information or context to guide your readers through your essay. Think about what your readers will need to know to understand the rest of your essay. Provide this information in your first paragraph. If you are writing about a specific day in history, summarize the day's events.

Then, explain how it fits into a broader historical scope. If you are writing about a person, name the person and provide a brief biography. Keep in mind that your context should lead up to your thesis statement.

Explain everything your reader needs to know to understand what your topic is about. Then narrow it down until you reach the topic itself. Provide your thesis statement. Your thesis statement should be sentences that express your main argument. If your essay is purely informative, it should address your methods for presenting your information to your readers. Determine how many paragraphs to include. The most common length for an expository essay is five-paragraphs, but an expository essay can be longer than that.

Refer to your assignment guidelines or ask your instructor if you are unsure about the required length of your paper. A five-paragraph essay should include three body paragraphs. Each body paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence that supports your thesis. Each paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence. Begin each paragraph with a topic sentence. The topic sentence introduces the main idea of the paragraph.

It should introduce one piece of supporting evidence that supports your thesis. If you're working with a specific text, you may start with a direct quote or a properly cited paraphrase of the argument you're referencing. There are a lot of expository essay topics to choose from. Then you should focus on your reader. Brainstorm ideas and choose the topic which is able to attract your audience.

Avoid general topics and be specific. Narrow your research sphere, making it clear and concise. Here you will find expository essay topics, which will help you come up with the most suitable one, depending on your educational establishment requirements. Are you ready with the topic? Then the next step will be to learn more about the expository essay structure. Those who have already written essays know how to write an expository essay as the structure is somewhat similar to the one other papers have.

It should be well-organized and sound logical. As any other essay, there is an introductory part, a body consisting of not less than paragraphs, and a conclusion. When writing an expository essay , remember that a key to success is a logical plan. Before you write your essay from scratch, you should work on an outline. An introduction is the most important part of your piece of writing. It is very important to pay special attention to the opening sentence.

What is an Expository Essay?

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What Is Expository Writing? The purpose of the expository essay is to explain a topic in a logical and straightforward manner. Without bells and whistles, these essays present a fair and balanced analysis of a subject based on facts—with no references to the writer’s opinions or emotions.

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If you search the Internet for a definition of an expository essay, you might become confused. Some books and websites define them as "how to" essays, while others give a long and confusing definition that seems to include every possible essay type out there. Expository essays are simply essays that.

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The basics for writing a compelling expository essay. Expository essays are used throughout academia, but this type of writing is also used in magazines, newspapers, technical writing and other areas. Five of the most common types of expository writing are descriptive essays, process essays, comparison essays, cause/effect essays and problem/solution essays.

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How To Write An Expository Essay. Writing an expository essay shouldn’t be difficult at this point. As with any piece, the first thing to start with is an outline. Organize all your thoughts and information in the correct expository essay format. Expository essays are essays that cover or expose a topic that you’ve selected, in a straightforward away. The purpose is to provide information about the topic, rather than influence what the reader thinks.