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Qualitative Research

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Comparison of Qualitative and Quantitative Research

Quantitative Research
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Unlike qualitative research, which allows unlimited expression from respondents, quantitative research relies responses to pre-formulated questions. Its findings are often not conclusive and cannot automatically be used to make generalizations. However, it is indispensable in developing a deep understanding of a given thematic complex and sound rationale for further decision making.

Quantitative research is essential for providing a broad base of insight on which typically a final course of action is recommended. Sample selection in qualitative research is usually based on a smaller number of not-necessarily representative cases.

Respondents are frequently selected with the expectation that they fulfill certain criteria. In quantitative research, sample selection seeks out a large number of cases that are expected to best represent the population of interest. Individual respondents are selected at random. Qualitative data analysis is non-statistical, its methodological approach is primarily guided by the concrete material at hand. In quantitative research, the sole approach to data is statistical and takes places in the form of tabulations.

Findings are usually descriptive in nature although conclusive only within the numerical framework. Rather, one could compare the two approaches as follows: Quantitative research seeks out explanatory laws whereas qualitative research aims more at in-depth description.

Qualitative research measures, in hopes of developing universal laws where qualitative research can be described as an exploration of what is assumed to be a dynamic reality. Qualitative research does not claim that what is discovered in the process is universal, and thus, replicable.

Common differences usually cited between these types of research include. In general, qualitative research generates rich, detailed and valid process data that contribute to the in-depth understanding of a context.

Quantitative research, on the other hand, generates reliable population-based and generalizable data that is suited to establishing cause-and-effect relationships.

On the other hand, Quantitative Research makes use of tools such as questionnaires, surveys, measurements and other equipment to collect numerical or measurable data. The presentation of data in a Qualitative Research is in the form of words from interviews and images videos or objects such as artifacts.

If you are conducting a Qualitative Research what will most likely appear in your discussion are figures in the form of graphs. However, if you are conducting a Quantitative Research, what will most likely appear in your discussion are tables containing data in the form of numbers and statistics.

Qualitative Research is primarily subjective in approach as it seeks to understand human behavior and reasons that govern such behavior. Researchers have the tendency to become subjectively immersed in the subject matter in this type of research method. In Quantitative Research, researchers tend to remain objectively separated from the subject matter. This is because Quantitative Research is objective in approach in the sense that it only seeks precise measurements and analysis of target concepts to answer his inquiry.

Qualitative research , Quantitative research. Debates have been ongoing, tackling which method is better than the other. The reason why this remains unresolved until now is that, each has its own strengths and weaknesses which actually vary depending upon the topic the researcher wants to discuss. If your study aims to find out the answer to an inquiry through numerical evidence, then you should make use of the Quantitative Research.

However, if in your study you wish to explain further why this particular event happened, or why this particular phenomenon is the case, then you should make use of Qualitative Research.

Some studies make use of both Quantitative and Qualitative Research, letting the two complement each other. If your study aims to find out, for example, what the dominant human behavior is towards a particular object or event and at the same time aims to examine why this is the case, it is then ideal to make use of both methods.

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While defining quantitative and qualitative research based on their uses and purposes may be considered a practical approach for researcher, the difference actually lies .

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Qualitative vs Quantitative Research. Here’s a more detailed point-by-point comparison between the two types of research: 1. Goal or Aim of the Research. The primary aim of a Qualitative Research is to provide a complete, detailed description of the research topic. It is usually more exploratory in nature.

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1 Chapter 2 Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Research This chapter is our introduction to the three research methodology paradigms. A paradigm is a perspective based on a set of assumptions, concepts, and values that are held by a community or researchers. Qualitative: Quantitative: Definitions: a systematic subjective approach used to describe life experiences and give them meaning: a formal, objective, systematic process for .

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Qualitative research collects information that seeks to describe a topic more than measure it. Learn the difference between these two forms of data and when you should use them. Quantitative research is designed to collect cold, hard facts. Qualitative Methods Quantitative Methods Methods include focus groups, in-depth interviews, and reviews of documents for types of themes.