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Essays on Poetic Theory

How to Write a Poetry Analysis Essay Step-by-Step?

❶This was especially evident in the nineteenth century.

What Is a Poetry Analysis?

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All poetry essays should have a proper beginning and a proper end. You can refer a poetry essay example for a better understanding. Anyone can write essays on poetry. All that is really needed is a sound knowledge on literature and poetry. You can always find a sample poetry essay on the Internet. Here are a few quick tips on poetry paper writing or a poetry analysis essay. The first thing that you need to do when you write an essay about poetry is to introduce the poem by writing an introductory paragraph..

Essays on poetry are supposed to make the reader understand the poem much better. Any shape or cluster of human history still apparent in the conscious and unconscious habit of Auden— from The Orators: Prose Home Harriet Blog. Visit Home Events Exhibitions Library. Essays on Poetic Theory. Looking to learn about poetry? Essay on Poetic Theory. Some Notes on Organic Form. Showing 1 to 20 of 55 Essays. Cracks in the Oracle Bone: Teaching Certain Contemporary Poems.

By Brenda Hillman By Nathaniel Mackey Female Tradition as Feminist Innovation. By Annie Finch By Barbara Guest The Poetics of Disobedience. By Alice Notley In this way, Agard manages to open his poem and introduce a key theme. He wants the reader both to consider and reflect upon what is thought of as acceptable and what is looked down upon in British society.

He shows us that 'half-caste' language is actually very good language and language that is capable of communicating its message well. Poetry Poetry has, as has been said above, been called the art of 'saying the unsayable'. Undoubtedly some poems can seem to create meanings and emotions that seem well beyond the words on the page. Language can be a very mysterious and wonderful thing! Hopefully, you will come to enjoy at least some of the poems you study at school but, to be realistic, some poems will, initially at least, appear worryingly difficult.

Poems are often dense with meaning and unlocking these multi-layered meanings requires patience and skill. But it can be very satisfying - a poem can be like a riddle, fun to crack!

This english biz guide will help you 'unpick' a poem and enable you to work out just what the poet is trying to say, how the poem is 'working' and why this is being done - the poet's purpose. Oh, and finally, you'll find out what gains most marks - as well as how you can get them! Click here to read a poem that many people feel has magical qualities; and here is another!

Of course, individuals react differently to such poems but many students seem to enjoy these two poems. Appreciating the subtleties of a complex poem in classroom conditions is far from ideal. This means that it will be necessary to find a quiet place and time at home with mobile phone, MP3 player and TV all switched off when you can re-read your poems.

Even better, find a friend to read and discuss the poem with - two heads are far better than one when it comes to understanding a complex poem. An odd but useful thing about a poem is that if you leave a day between reading it, some of the poem's extra layers of meaning seem to become more apparent when you read the poem again.

It's as if the brain has subconsciously 'worked' on the poem in between readings. Reading for Meaning Quite a useful thing to do when you first begin your work on analysing a poem is to Odd as this sounds, your first task is not to dig for hidden meanings but to be sure you've understood the poem's 'story' - that is, what it is generally all about. This can be called the poem's ' big picture '.

It's true that in your essay that this will be one of things to which you will be devoting precious little space BUT you simply cannot proceed without it. So, when you first read any poem, first of all, read it for meaning. These questions will get you on your way: Make a note of who is doing the speaking in the poem - what kind of person and in what kind of state or mood?

By the way, never assume it's the poet: Poets often like to explore all kinds of aspects of life in their work and this can mean that they try to write from different viewpoints, for example an older male poet can write as a young boy, or even girl! Now work out who is being spoken to or addressed? Yes - it could be you, the poem's reader, or it might be an imaginary person.

Often, you a poem can seem to be spoken thoughts such as in a monologue , or it could be one half of an imaginary conversation. Think about just what is being spoken about? What is the subject matter being discussed? Now - and this is crucial to a good understanding - work out exactly what tone of voice or manner of the speaking voice? Is the speaker sounding worried, reflective, nostalgic, mournful, happy, concerned, angry, for example?

Importantly, does the tone of voice change during the poem? Make a note of where this occurs. Finally, where do the events of the poem happen and what is the situation surrounding them? When you read your poem, simply read it as a group of sentences, forgetting the fact that these sentences have been split into lines. At the end of each sentence i. Spend time thinking about this and perhaps note the idea down on the poem itself at the side of that part of the poem this is called annotating the text.

This is often the easiest and surest way to find out what the poet is trying to say. You can consider the effects of other poetic devices the poet has used, such as the way the lines cut up the sentences, the use of rhythm and rhyme , alliteration and so on later.

Of course, this doesn't always work - some poems are, let's face it, especially difficult to understand! They might even lack any punctuation so have no apparent sentences. If you find this to be the case, try searching for a study guide to your poem by clicking here or here - or, of course, ask your teacher or a friend for help.

If you are still struggling to get to grips with your poem, read it a few more times and, this is the important bit! Most people race through poems using a dull voice. Even better in fact, far better! Oh yes, you really should! Find a quiet place, or read with a friend. Put embarrassment to one side for the sake of a higher grade! Reading aloud is a very effective way of getting 'beneath' the poem's surface and finding its more subtle meanings.

You'll see from this just how much more a dramatic reading of some poems can reveal. Always avoid reading the poem in an overly stylised way , i. Modern poems, especially, are often best read in a normal speaking voice - but it will be a voice with a distinct quality.

Do always try to capture this distinctiveness. Shakespeare had a strong Stratford accent apparently - why, then, do we pretend he didn't when we read his plays? Can you work out the method , effects and purpose of the various ideas and images the words of the poem create? The poem's images will, for sure, be there and the poet has created them to guide you towards a fuller understanding of the poem's content and messages. Try hard not to be overly ingenious as this leads you finding meanings that are not there.

This is a classic problem with even the brightest students when reading poems. Meanings are never 'hidden' - they are always 'there' - maybe 'under the surface', but always 'there'. And they are always consistent with the whole poem. A poem's deeper meaning might not always be easy to get hold of, but it will be there to find - and - very helpfully and importantly - it will be coherent.

Coherence is an important quality of all literature, poems included. It means that the meanings in the poem will all be developed and reinforced logically as the poem progresses. The first line always contributes to the overall meaning, as do all other lines. If you do think you've found a meaning in a poem and it does not contribute in some obvious way to the overall meaning of the whole poem , you are almost certainly off track and misreading the poem: Click here to listen to John Agard reading a part of his poem, Half-Caste.

Notice the slow and emphatic nature of his voice. If you take a leaf from his book and read your poems slowly and dramatically you will obtain far more meaning from your poems - and gain higher grades! Writing your essay Writing an essay about a poem needs the same skills that apply to all essay writing. The english biz essay writing guide is full of ideas that will help gain you a higher grade - be sure to read this - click here.

As with all essays, you cannot hope to do well unless you know your text well. Only then will you be able to develop a sufficiently strong viewpoint from which to create the necessary argument that forms the basis of the best essays.

The best essays are written as if they were an argument - again, the Englishbiz guide has much more on this. What is your teacher or examiner actually looking for in your essays? Whatever the essay question or title, marks are always awarded according to how well you show your abilities in three key areas: You need to show you have understood how the poet has used language and poetic devices to help create and 'shape' create subtle underlying messages.

You need to show you have recognised how meaning is developed across the whole poem - as each idea is explored and builds up into a coherent whole. How to do this to gain high marks Read the essay question or title very carefully. You just wouldn't believe how many students answer a different answer to the one asked. Yes - they do, every year! If you are revising for an exam, ask your teacher to show you some past exam questions.


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An Essay on Poetry. Steven C. Scheer. According to the Judeo-Christian Bible, God created the world by means of words, by divine fiat. He said "Let there be," and there was. So it was words that brought the world into existence in the first place, and it is words (by means of human fiat, if you will) that create our own worlds as well. For it.

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The Poetry of Robert Burns - Despite his later fame as the greatest Scottish poet, Robert Burns had humble origins. He was born on January 25th, , to William Burns in Alloway, Ayrshire, Scotland.

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"A Short Essay On Poetry" by David Schubert A poet who observes his own poetry ends up, in spite of it, by finding nothing to observe, just as a man who pays too much attention to the way he walks, finds his legs walking off from under him. The final element of writing a poetry analysis essay is a part of the composition dedicated to the subject matter of the poem. This can be analyzed during the reader’s quest to determine the theme, tone, mood, and meaning of the poem.

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Sample Essay English "Hurting Love": Reckoning Poetry's Costs In Gwendolyn Brooks' "First Fight. Then Fiddle." Gwendolyn Brooks' "First fight. Then Fiddle." initially seems to argue for the necessity of brutal war in order to create a space for the pursuit of beautiful art. The poem is more complex, however, because it also implies both. Poetry is created from the soul, it feeds from your emotions and squeezes out every ounce of creativity from your delicate bones. It cannot be summed up or critiqued in a few short words.